Illinois Governor Vetoes Heroin Bill

Originally posted on The Drug War Chronicles, by psmith, August 26, 2015, 03:45pm

“Faced with a public health crisis related to heroin and prescription opioid use, the Illinois state government created a bipartisan Heroin Task Force in a comprehensive effort to address the problem from all angles. The task force created a set of policy recommendations that were embodied in House Bill 1, the Heroin Crisis Act.

Heroin is taking a toll not only in Chicago, but in its suburbs. (kirk.senate.gov)

The bill passed the House and Senate in May, and was sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) in June,

People lining up to buy heroin in Chicago.

People lining up to buy heroin in Chicago.

where it sat on his desk until this week. On Monday, Rauner finally acted — not by signing the bill, but by vetoing critical sections of it that he says the state cannot afford. He has now sent the bill back to the legislature and asked it to remove the offending sections.

But saying, “People are dying,” the measure’s House sponsor, Rep. Lou Lang (D-Skokie), has vowed an effort to override the veto. An override could be within reach — the bill passed by veto-proof majorities in both houses — but for members of a governor’s own party, a veto override is a hard vote to take.

Here’s what the bill does:

  • It increases the availability of opiate overdose reversal drugs and requires private insurance to cover at least one of them, as well as acute treatment and stabilization services. It allows licensed pharmacists to dispense overdose reversal drugs, allows school nurses to administer them to students suffering from overdoses, and provides protection from civil liability for people who administer them in good faith.
  • It requires the Department of Human Services and the State Board of Education to develop a three-year pilot heroin prevention program for all schools in the state, requires the Department of Human Services to develop materials to educate prescription opiate users on the dangers of those drugs, and it requires the Department of Insurance to convene working groups on drug treatment and mental illness and on parity between state and federal mental health laws.
  • It intensifies the state’s prescription monitoring program by tightening reporting requirements and it requires doctors to now document the medical necessity of any three sequential 30-day prescriptions for Schedule II opioids.
  • On the criminal justice front, it permits multiple chances at drug court and prevents prosecutors from unilaterally blocking entry to drug court, and it requires prosecutors and public defenders to undergo mandatory education on addiction and addiction treatment. It also increases criminal penalties for “doctor shopping” if fraud is involved.
  • It requires Medicaid coverage of all heroin treatment, including methadone and other opiate maintenance treatment, as well as all anti-overdose medications.

It’s the latter provision to which Rauner objects. CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE…

Illinois Governor Vetoes Heroin Bill

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